Sling TV Review 2017

Sling TV Logo

When looking for an alternative to a three-digit monthly cable bill, my wife and I decided to give Sling TV a shot almost two years ago.

 

Sling TV is a television streaming service that is a direct competitor to cable television.  It’s an internet based service that delivers live television from many of the same channels you would expect to see on your cable lineup at a fraction of the cost.

 

How Sling TV Works

 

You can start an account and be watching tv in as little as five minutes by simply inputting your information and a valid card number (I used my debit card since we don’t do credit cards.)

 

Sling basically offers two paths with a lot of optional add-ons.  The basic package, Sling Orange, gives you the ability to watch their basic channels on one device at a time for $20 a month (accurate as of this posting).  This is the package we have.  Sling is compatible with just about any major device out there, and you can have your account on all of them.  However, with Sling Orange, you can only view on one at a time.

 

Sling Blue, starting at $5/month more than Orange at the time of this writing, allows streaming on up to three devices simultaneously with many more channels included in the base group.

 

For both Sling Orange and Sling Blue, there are several $5/month packages that you can add.  These include a sports package, comedy, kids, and even a cloud DVR package.  There are additional extras like HBO and Showtime that can be added for a bit more than these.

 

Once your account is running, it operates pretty much like a Netflix or other popular streaming service.  We use a Roku on our tv to access our streaming and music, so I click the Sling TV icon from the menu to open it, scroll across the top to the Guide list, and from there I can see the schedules of all the channels I have and watch what I want.

 

From there the experience is just like watching normal tv.  There are commercials specific to a streaming audience, and you can switch channels just like a regular tv viewing experience.

 

What’s Great

 

Perhaps my favorite feature of Sling TV is that each channel affords the ability to watch certain shows on demand.  This is great when I watch a show like AMC’s The Walking Dead (I really hope they kill Negan this season) but also don’t want to watch when it’s live.  I know that within a day or two the episode will be available on demand, and I can watch it when it’s convenient for me.

 

The cost is also a huge plus.  Cutting cable and having just our internet access and Sling TV to pay for each month eliminated about 50% of the bill we would’ve had if we had the same channels Sling gives us on a cable bill.  Obviously, that’s a huge positive.

 

The quality of channels you get for the base price of $20/month (again, that’s accurate at the time of this writing and may change as time goes on or as they have promotions) is also great.  We’re not talking a bunch of stuff with nothing popular on it.  You’re pretty much getting the channels most of us watch when we pay for cable without the ones we just ignore but still pay for.

 

Lastly, the extra packages you can add-on for $5/month or a little more are a nice option.  Obviously, you don’t want to go crazy here, otherwise you aren’t cutting your overall cost any.  We added just one package, the sports one, because my beloved Kentucky Wildcats football team (yes, Kentucky fans care about football too) just hasn’t quite escaped the SEC network every week onto the big stage.  Having that package bumps us up to $26 and some change after tax each month.

 

What Could Be Better

 

First off, there’s the obvious negative with all streaming services that wireless internet networks aren’t as reliable as a hard-wired cable connection.  Therefore, there are times that my shows will pause for a second to buffer.

 

Normally, it’s just for a couple of seconds and then it picks right up without skipping anything.  It happens rarely for us, and we also have a pretty old Roku instead of one of the newer ones, so that could be to blame.

 

Another negative is that the ability to rewind or fast forward on demand viewings differs channel to channel.  Some channels allow it, others don’t.

 

If watching on demand on a channel that doesn’t allow these functions, you have to watch commercials.  It’s especially frustrating when a show pauses for buffering near the end and never recovers.  In those circumstances, when the buffer wheel becomes the endless wheel of death, you must watch the whole thing through again to get where you were.

 

Again, this varies channel to channel, but is something to be aware of.

 

What You Need

 

There are a few things you need to have in place should you decide Sling TV is the way to go.

 

Internet

 

This is kind of a no brainer, but I thought I’d mention it.  You can cut the cable from your provider, but you’ll still need them for internet access.

 

Devices

 

If you plan to watch on an actual tv, you’ll need a Roku so that you can stream Sling TV to your television.  You can also watch it on your phone, tablet, laptop, etc.

 

Sling TV Subscription

 

If you click on this link or any of the Sling TV links in this post, you can try it out for FREE for 7 days to decide if you like it.  By following my links, I’ll get a small commission if you choose to continue service past those 7 days at no additional cost to you.

 

How We Use It

 

Cutting cable was an easy choice for us, and we’ve added a few things to the mix that make it so we still can enjoy tv, but also save some monthly expense.

 

Antenna

 

We bought an antenna for cheap, which lets us watch the major networks available in our area like NBC, CBS, and ABC for free.

 

Sling TV

 

We then got our subscription to Sling TV, added the sports package, and now have access, through Sling on our Roku and the channels on our antenna, to anything we want to watch.

 

If you’re happy with your cable bill, then this may not be for you.  But if you’re looking to cut a few dollars each month from your spending, Sling TV has worked great for us.

 

One last tidbit of advice I have would be to call your Internet provider through this process and try to negotiate a cheaper rate.  I’ve done this multiple times, and you’ll be surprised how much their prices aren’t set in stone.  Just a little thought for you!

 

Have you cut cable yet?

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